Sector Opportunities

Survey: Cultural Contributions by People of Colour in the West Country

The Institute of Cultural Enquiry, based at Exeter University, is seeking to discover blocks or obstacles to Cultural Producers of colour in the West Country (Cornwall, Devon, Dorset and Somerset).

The Institute of Cultural Enquiry, based at Exeter University, are seeking feedback for a body of work moving forward to support the sector.

The project is called “In Joseph Emidy’s footsteps: Cultural Contributions by People of Colour in the West Country”. The project’s aims are:

  • To empower people of colour in the SW (in particular cultural producers)
  • To find opportunities for Exeter Humanities researchers to work with them
  • To start to build a network of practitioners, academics and partners.
  • Through a seminar in mid-March and a report shortly afterwards (it’s a very short timeline!).

As part of that process, Ghee Bowman is gathering data from a wide swathe of people in the SW (and beyond) at the survey HERE

The purpose of the survey is to discover blocks or obstacles that slow down cultural producers of colour* in the West Country (Cornwall, Devon, Dorset and Somerset), and how Exeter University or other organisations could remove those blocks. They also want to build a network of such producers and their supporters.

‘Cultural Producer’, means artists of all sorts, musicians and other performers, craftspeople, as well as heritage workers, writers – everything to do with people and the Humanities. They include people whose creative skills are linked to their cultural traditions and not their paid work.

* By ‘People of Colour’ it means the broadest possible definition, to include the Gypsy Roma Traveller community, the Jewish community and Eastern European communities as well as people of African and Asian heritage, in recognition of the fact that they have all been/are all subject to racism and discrimination.

(This project recognises the ongoing debate around terminology. ‘People of Colour’ is not a perfect term, but has the advantage of being broadly understood and acceptable, including to many people placed within that grouping, as well as clear and easy to use).

 

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