New Course – Arts, Culture and Heritage: Understanding their complex effects on our health

Developed by the Royal Society for Public Health, University College London and the MARCH Network, this course is aimed at early careers researchers and community organisations.

In the last decade, researchers have increasingly focused on how community resources, or ‘assets,’ can protect and enhance health and wellbeing. These assets can be mobilised to improve individuals’ health, known as an asset-based approach to health.

Assets are wide-ranging. They are the resources, skills and knowledge of individuals, community and voluntary associations, public and private organisations, and physical environments. They include libraries, writing groups, archives, gardens, exercise classes, sporting events, volunteering and charitable groups, and community organisations such as youth services, trade unions, and religious groups.

There are an estimated 1 million assets within communities in the UK, ranging from theatre societies to community gardens.

RSPH and University College London (UCL), supported by the MARCH Network, have developed this course to increase knowledge and understanding of how community resources, including arts, culture and heritage activities can improve our physical and mental health and wellbeing.

Who is the course aimed at?

The course is aimed at early careers researchers and community organisations with an interest in understanding how community resources, including arts, culture and heritage activities can improve our physical and mental health and wellbeing.

How much does the course cost?

The course will also be available to purchase for £30.

UCL and RSPH are providing a limited number of free course accounts per year. Free accounts will be provided on a first come first served basis to ECRs, based on them meeting a set of approval criteria.

Find out more HERE

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